Thursday, 23 February 2012

China decries Japan mayor for denying Nanjing massacre

China denounced a Japanese mayor on Wednesday for denying that Japanese troops inflicted a wartime massacre on Nanjing, and warned Tokyo to tread carefully over sensitive historical terrain that has long soured ties.


See this mother fucker face? His people dared to murder, rape and torture but dare not own up.  That's why Japs cannot be forgiven like the Germans. The last earthquake and tsunami to hit Japan was perhaps too gentle - they deserve more.

1 comment:

Guanyu 道 said...

China decries Japan mayor for denying Nanjing massacre

Reuters
23 February 2012

China denounced a Japanese mayor on Wednesday for denying that Japanese troops inflicted a wartime massacre on Nanjing, and warned Tokyo to tread carefully over sensitive historical terrain that has long soured ties.

The Chinese Foreign Ministry’s rebuke to the mayor of Nagoya, Takashi Kawamura, was the latest flare-up showing how ties between the two Asian neighbours remain dogged by memories of Japan’s invasion of much of China from 1931 to 1945.

The mayor told visiting officials from Nanjing, an eastern Chinese city, that Japanese troops did not massacre civilians in the city in 1937.

“There regrettably were conventional battles in Nanjing, but there was no massacre,” Mayor Kawamura said.

Kawamura’s father was in Nanjing at the end of World War Two, and people in the city were very nice to him, he told the Chinese delegation.

“Why were they so nice to Japanese soldiers if something like the Nanjing incident had happened just eight years earlier?” he asked.

But for a great many Chinese people, the bloodshed unleashed by Japanese troops in Nanjing exemplifies the brutality of the wartime occupation, and the Chinese Foreign Ministry backed the city’s decision to suspend ties with Nagoya, its sister city.

“China has already made expressed its solemn stance regarding the Nagoya mayor’s denial of the Nanjing massacre, and has also made solemn representations to the Japanese side,” Foreign Ministry spokesman Hong Lei told a daily briefing.

“Nanjing has made the decision to suspend contacts with Nagoya, and we express our understanding and support for this.”

China and Japan this year mark 40 years since they resumed diplomatic relations, and Hong warned Tokyo to be mindful of historical sensitivities “in such an important year”.

China says Japanese troops killed 300,000 people in what was then the national capital. A postwar Allied tribunal put the death toll at 142,000, but some conservative Japanese politicians and scholars deny a massacre took place.

Ties between Beijing and Tokyo have also been strained by disputes over demarcation of their boundaries in the East China Sea and control of natural gas beds under its waters.

In 2005, Chinese cities erupted in torrid and occasionally violent protests against then Japanese Prime Minister Junchiro Koizumi’s visits to the Yasukuni Shrine, which Beijing and other Asian governments say pays undue homage to war criminals.

Japan should “follow the spirit of using history as a mirror and facing towards the future to striving together with China to promote the healthy and stable progress of Sino-Japanese relations,” said the spokesman, Hong.

(Reporting by Chris Buckley in Beijing and Kiyoshi Takenaka in Tokyo; Editing by Nick Macfie)